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Free research essays on topics related to: american women

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  • American Women During Wwii - 1,808 words
    ... during the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends s ...
    Related: american, american politicians, american society, american women, black women, employed women, most american
  • Why African American Women Are So Disappointed In There Relationships - 695 words
    The divorce rate for African American women is 60%, which is a devastating number. In most black households the statistics becomes a reality. This occurs more often because black women rush into love too soon and frequently end up with marginal men. Women in highly publicized relationships unfortunately have not been inspiring role models to young black women. Tina Turner and Whitney Houston-Brown endured abuse for the name of love where as Robin Givens realized she had to release her self from the relationship before receiving even more abuse. Tina married her manager, Ike because she thought Ike loved her and got into a marriage to be taken care of. Ike did take care of her but not mentall ...
    Related: african, african american, american, american women, black women
  • American Women During World War Ii - 1,808 words
    ... during the war years for many men hoped that marriage would defer conscription to the war. This alone suggests that women's roles as wives and mothers were still dominant during the war because the nation witnessed a 25 percent rise in the population aged five and under. The popularity of marriage and the traditional gender roles that marriage carried, was exploited during the war. For example, the Office of War Information, established in the summer of 1942, worked closely with the media. President Roosevelt soon denied the OWI was being used for propaganda , yet only months after the OWI was formed, wartime propaganda began to likened women's war work to domestic chores. These trends s ...
    Related: after world, american, american politicians, american society, american women, black women, employed women
  • Native American Women - 1,152 words
    On few subjects has there been such continual misconception as on the position of women among Indians. Because she was active, always busy in the camp, often carried heavy burdens, attended to the household duties, made the clothing and the home, and prepared the family food, the woman has been depicted as the slave of her husband, a patient beast of encumbrance whose labors were never done. The man, on the other hand, was said to be an loaf, who all day long sat in the shade of the lodge and smoked his pipe, while his overworked wives attended to his comfort. In actuality, the woman was the man's partner, who preformed her share of the obligations of life and who employed an influence quite ...
    Related: american, american indians, american southwest, american women, men and women, native american, native americans
  • 6 Major Advantages Of Russian/european Women Over American Women - 1,475 words
    6 Major Advantages of Russian/European Women Over American Women (What the average American doesnt know and will never hear from their politically correct feminist media) Introductory Note: As someone who has approached and met literally thousands of women in Russia/Europe and America, and who personally knows hundreds of women throughout 18 cities of Russia, Ukraine, and Europe, I can absolutely guarantee that the following six major advantages outlined here are absolutely true and testable. My website at www.geocities.com/wwu777us contains a hundred times more than enough proof of this. Please note that though I acknowledge that while certain qualities vary universally among individuals (e ...
    Related: american, american women, average american, european women, most american, women in russia, young women
  • Fashion And Culture Among American Women In The 1920s - 1,287 words
    There are many types of people in the world today. The past has shown how the fashion has changed. Each era has their own different style and fashion. The twenties was a particularly wild decade. After WW1, it was a time for change. Women became rebellious and shocked everyone by their new style and morals(Louise brooks Society, 3). Women before the twenties were more conservative and were obligated to act like ladies. The rising of music like jazz gave women motivation to be individuals and have fun. Dances like the Charleston had an influence on women in the twenties. Cutting hair and exposing skin was rare considering women in the past had never been daring or even thought about being reb ...
    Related: american, american culture, american women, fashion, working women
  • Strength Within Creativity - 748 words
    Despite oppression, African-American women of the past were able to overcome obstacles by taking on the role of artists. They relied on their creative spirits to carry them through their wretched existence. In Alice Walker's essay "In Search of Our Mothers' Gardens," she explains how the mothers and grandmothers of her generation held on to their dignity and strength through their expression of creativity. The boldness represented by this creativity shows the dynamic depth of their souls and the courage they found within it. Walker gives examples of some of these women in her essay and uses this method to effectively express her point. Women such as Mahalia Jackson, Elizabeth Catlett, and Fr ...
    Related: creativity, african american, short story, american women, american
  • Beloved - 1,135 words
    Toni Morrison was born in Loraine, Ohio on February 18, 1931. She has accomplished many things from then until now. From writing several books to being a trustee of the National Humanities Center, she finds the time to remain grounded and stable. She has written many books, one namely Beloved which focuses on one womans trials and tribulations. Beloved is about a woman named Sethe, now living in the Reconstruction-era farming country of Ohio. Proud and beautiful, she escaped from slavery, but is haunted by its heritage. She must deal with this haunted life on every level, from the fires of the flesh to the heartbreaking challenges to the spirit. Set in rural Ohio several years after the Civi ...
    Related: beloved, toni morrison, free state, black people, recount
  • Beloved - 1,058 words
    ... ownership took place, her bond with her children was complete. The escape from slavery did nothing more than intensify this bond. For the first time she felt she could love her children unreservedly and had a vision of true freedom: "Look like I loved em more after I got here. Or maybe I couldn't love 'em in Kentucky because they wasn't mine to love...A place where you could love anything you choose--not to need permission for desire--well now that was freedom"(Page 162). Gender issues are also dominant in the story. Three of the four main characters are female, and it not only tells the story of an ex-slave but of a woman's life. Slavery is the cause ofSethe being in the situation she i ...
    Related: beloved, racial prejudice, afro american, black identity, plantation
  • Equal Pay - 1,688 words
    Pay equity means of eliminating sex and race discrimination in the wage-setting system. The wage gap is currently at 73 cents to the dollar. That means the wage gap has narrowed by less than a half penny per year. There are currently two laws that protect against wage discrimination, The Equal Pay Act of 1963, which prohibits unequal pay or substantially equal work performed by men and women. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits wage discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, religion or national origin. Pay equity is a benefit for everyone. Women and people of color should not be in fear of asking how much someone else is making or to question, why they arent making a c ...
    Related: equal employment, current population survey, federal law, christian science monitor, welfare
  • Diversity In The Workplace - 1,141 words
    Workplace Diversity: Fact or Fiction? Are todays corporate diversity programs truly effective? That question, posed by Robert J Grossman in an article carried by the Wall Street Journal Online on June 28, 2000, will be explored as part of the review of Mr. Grossmans article. The concept of diversity goes well beyond the historical employment equity legislation enacted in both federal and local jurisdictions. It calls for the recognition of the contributions that individuals can make as individuals, not just as members of legislatively designated groups. It calls for management of organizations to be totally inclusive, not just tolerating those who are different but celebrating those differen ...
    Related: diversity, diversity in the workplace, managing diversity, workplace, workplace diversity
  • Managing Diversity - 1,629 words
    Managing diversity in the workplace is a subject that has gained increased attention among managers during the last two decades. After all, the impact of affirmative action and equal employment opportunity programs on the nation's work force is undeniable. Women and minorities were the first to dramatically alter the face of the economic mainstream, while gays, persons with disabilities and senior citizens followed not far behind. The result is a diverse American labor force representing a microcosm of our society - yet one that continues to struggle with its identity. Diversity as a social condition is not new to the U.S. Founded by immigrants, the nation has always been a merger of culture ...
    Related: diversity, diversity in the workplace, diversity issues, managing, managing conflict, managing diversity, workplace diversity
  • Privatize Social Security - 1,526 words
    ... er. More and more people in the United States are starting to invest their money in the stock market, mutual funds, savings accounts, bonds, etc. They feel that they are smart enough to take care of their own investments and do not need the government to take care of them like children. They also do not feel comfortable with living on Social Security when it comes time to retire. James K. Glassman from US News & World Report writes about how the governments help is not need for people whom now how to invest their money for retirement. Currently Social Security returns an average of 1 to 2 percent, so this is why people feel they can do better investing themselves and do. He feels that th ...
    Related: private security, social security, bottom line, world report, american
  • Joy Luck - 1,481 words
    E-AMERICAN WOMEN IN AMERICAN CULTURE In Amy Tan's novel, The Joy Luck Club, there is one episode, "Waiting Between the Trees," illustrating major concerns facing Chinese-American women. Living with their traditional culture in American society, Chinese-American women suffer the problems of culture conflicts. While their American spouses are active and assertive, they are passive and place their happiness entirely on the goodness of their husbands. At one time, this passiveness can be seen as a virtue; at other time, it is a vice or a weakness. In studying the lives of two personalities, Ying-Ying and Lena St. Clair, a Chinese mother and a half-Chinese daughter, one can see these conflicts mo ...
    Related: joy luck club, luck, luck club, the joy luck club, american girl
  • Body Image - 1,074 words
    Through the use of imagery, the display of life-styles, and the reinforcement of values, advertisements are communicators of culturally defined concepts such as success, worth, love, sexuality, popularity, and normalcy. Of particular concern over the past two decades has been excessive use of sexual stereotypes, especially of women. Women are directly affected by this advertising, beyond the mere desire to purchase the product or service described. The influence of the media on people is tremendous, and the effect of advertisements that direct images of beauty, and the perfect slim figure have a harmful effect on a great deal of the world's population, especially women. The media has portray ...
    Related: body image, self image, american women, eating disorders, imagery
  • Abigail Adams And Anne Bradstreet - 799 words
    Dear Anne Bradstreet and Abagail Adams, Im anxiously awaiting your arrival. I think your visit will be filled with shocking surprises and pleasurable impressions. Behind the boundless differences you will encounter, youll also meet with your very own American nature. Youll notice that your longing for womens rights and independence has actually been granted (Adams 283). You and other women were unemployed and oppressed, and had no representation (Bradstreet 98, Adams 283). Today, however, most American women are employed and encouraged to contribute their opinions and ideas. In fact, we even earned the right to vote in the nineteenth amendment. Youll find it quite strange seeing me drive fre ...
    Related: abigail, abigail adams, anne, anne bradstreet, bradstreet, john adams
  • The Connection Between Amy Tan And The Characters Of The Joy Luck Club - 1,031 words
    Amy Tan uses facts from her life and her own identity to create the character of Jing-Mei Woo for her first novel The Joy Luck Club. Amy Tan is a fictional writer, but unlike many other writers of that genre she writes about things that are very close to reality and her hart. In her firs published novel The Joy Luck Club Tan infuses the fictional part of the book with what seems to be facts from her own life. The novel contains autobiographical elements. FEMENIST STUDIES, (Vol.19, No.3, Fall 1998,pg. 98, critic: Marina Heung). Thus she is creating characters which strongly resemble her self and her own actions. Jing-Mei Woo, who is also known as June throughout the book, is a character who r ...
    Related: club, fictional character, joy luck club, luck, luck club, the joy luck club
  • Upre Court Abortion Decisions - 1,398 words
    Supreme Court Decisions That Greatly Impacted The Reproduction Rights Of Women When talking about Supreme Court decisions that have greatly impacted the lives of women it is very hard to settle on just five of the many cases that have been ruled in favor of the rights of women. When discussing the topic of reproductive freedom and The Supreme Courts rulings on these matters ten cases can and must be discussed in order to provide a total overview and timeline of these historic rulings. The American Civil Liberties Union has helped women breech the barriers of sexual repression, and has crusaded to help women win these reproductive rights and knowledge over the years since its founding in the ...
    Related: abortion, supreme court, roe v wade, lower class, georgia
  • Women In Combat - 695 words
    From Kelly Flinn to G.I. Jane, controversy has raged in recent months over whether women are fit for military service (Brown 326). In the articles Women Unfit for Combat? Au Contraire! and Women are not a Warrior Class, both authors convey their thoughts on women in combat. Both authors give many reasons why or why not women should be allowed to fight in combat. Timothy Brown, the author of Women Unfit for Combat? Au Contraire! gives many more strong examples to argue his case than the author of Women are not a Warrior Class and, consequently, has a more persuasive essay. In an effort to discourage women from considering combat rolls in the military, Paul Hackett, one of the authors of Women ...
    Related: american women, combat, men and women, women in combat, elizabeth cady stanton
  • Body Image - 614 words
    BEAUTY has always preoccupied women. But over the past two centuries, as women have gained more rights, the association of self-worth and appearance has intensified. "There has been this enormous change from girls being principally concerned with good works to now being concerned with good looks as a measure of their self-worth," says Joan Jacobs Brumberg, author of "The Body Project: An Intimate History of American Girls" and "Fasting Girls: The History of Anorexia Nervosa." Brumberg attributes the transformation in girls' behaviors to changes in technology, the coming of mirrors, modern hygiene, the rise of consumerism and popular culture. Attitudes towards attractiveness and ideals of bea ...
    Related: body image, popular culture, modern american, beauty myth, thin
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