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Free research essays on topics related to: federal government

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  • Power: The Federal Government And The Union Movement - 2,661 words
    When discussing power and its implications, one must take into account several key things: who the proponents are, what positions they hold, and what they have to gain from exercising power. Generally, it is obvious when power is employed, it is one group contesting the other, and an outcome is achieved by the exercise of power, usually by the group in the strongest position. However, often, relations become distorted when institutionalised power is at play, and likewise with people power groups. The present relations between the Federal Government and the union movement continues to be a struggle for both parties. By introducing Industrial reforms, the government has made a two-pronged atta ...
    Related: federal government, trade union, union members, union membership, workers union
  • Power: The Federal Government And The Union Movement - 2,636 words
    ... r the election in 1996, due to the fact that the industries concerned have a extraordinarily large union membership percentile (CMFEU 2001, http://www.cfmeu.asn.au/). The government saw these two unions as a threat to Industrial reforms, and formulated strategies to break their grip on the industries they represented. By the very force of their membership, the government knew that these unions were powerful enough to negate most attempts to shut them down. The government is generally reluctant to use the full extent of its power against people power groups like unions. A democracy, by its very nature doesnt sanction it. However, if they can use another source of power to manipulate relat ...
    Related: commonwealth government, federal court, federal election, federal government, union members, union membership, workers union
  • Equality To All - 2,176 words
    The question has been raised: who is in control of curriculum in our school? Not just the choosing of the precise books, but who is in charge of the contents of the books that curriculum directors can choose from? Once the answers to these questions are found, what should be done if they point to one group? So many problems in the United States have arisen when the people discover that one group is violating the peoples rights in some way by not allowing others power, that it would be logical to conclude that it would be perceived by many to be unfair if it is found that one interest group chooses what all American children learn, especially if that interest group is furthering their own int ...
    Related: united states, webster dictionary, sociological theory, notable, merriam
  • Equality To All - 2,112 words
    ... religious goal over 2,000 years ago in the Christian Scriptures. Bergman states, "Incidentally, the source of the belief in the equality of man is the Bible, few ancient books espouse this concept, and it is foreign to most non-Christian peoples (6)." Since these concepts are biblical in origin, why are the students not told this? What about the fact that abortion, homosexuality and fornication are talked about in school, but teachers are not allowed to discuss the religious side of the issue, only the side deemed non-religious? Though the public schools are teaching a type of religion, obviously, the students are not informed about it; in fact, the topic of religion is not deemed import ...
    Related: public school system, annotated bibliography, religious belief, orientation, catholicism
  • Alcohol - 516 words
    ...A CAPITAL OR OTHERWISE INFAMOUS CRIME... ... NOR BE DEPRIVED OF LIFE ... WITHOUT DUE PROCESS OF LAW... THE DEATH PENALTY UPHOLD THE CONSTITUTION BY PROTECTING THE PUBLIC AND RIDDING THE COUNTRY OF OFFENDERS WITH DUE PROCESS OF LAW. From 1882 through 1951 there were 4,730 recorded lynchings by vigilantes in the U.S, with many of them being highly public affairs. Even when miscreants were afforded a trial and executed in accordance with law, such events were often local in nature. For example, while states such as New York electrocuted condemned prisoners at Sing Sings electric chair as early as the late 19th century, in states such as Missouri hangings were conducted at local county jails ...
    Related: alcohol, new york, united states, penalty information center, protecting
  • Alcatraz - 878 words
    Alcatraz: United States Penitentiary As a result of the Great Depression, a new breed of violent criminals swept the streets of America. In response to the cries of alarmed citizens, Congress enacted a number of statutes, which gave the federal government jurisdiction over certain criminal offenses previously held by the states. With the suggestion of former US Attorney General, Homes Cummings, Congress agreed that a special penal institution of maximum security and minimum privilege be established. In 1934, the legendary US Penitentiary of Alcatraz was born and became the home of Americas most wanted for the next thirty years. Once authorized by Congress, the US Department of Justice acquir ...
    Related: alcatraz, department of justice, sean connery, security prison, johnston
  • Cival Rights Act 1964 - 1,990 words
    When the Government Stood Up For Civil Rights "All my life I've been sick and tired, and now I'm just sick and tired of being sick and tired. No one can honestly say Negroes are satisfied. We've only been patient, but how much more patience can we have?" Mrs. Hamer said these words in 1964, a month and a day before the historic Civil Rights Act of 1964 would be signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson. She speaks for the mood of a race, a race that for centuries has built the nation of America, literally, with blood, sweat, and passive acceptance. She speaks for black Americans who have been second class citizens in their own home too long. She speaks for the race that would be patient ...
    Related: black civil rights, civil rights, civil rights act, civil rights acts, civil rights bill, civil rights legislation, civil rights movement
  • Outsiders Locking In - 1,010 words
    In the United States something very odd happened during the period of time from the middle of the 1950's up to the impact of the crisis of the 1960's. For once in the storied history of the United States a majority of Americans accepted the same system of assumptions. This shared system of assumptions is known as the liberal consensus. The main reason there was such a thing as liberal consensus was because of the extreme economic growth we experienced in the U.S. during the post World War II era. However, the consensus didn't apply to one important group of people. These were the combat soldiers it the Vietnam War. Their experiences at home and abroad suggest that they were outsiders to the ...
    Related: outsiders, social sciences, free world, attend college, paranoid
  • Astor John Jacob - 549 words
    John Jacob Astor lived through1763-1848. He was a fur trader, businessman, and real estate investor. Astor began life as one of twelve children of a poor German butcher and died the richest man in America. The making of a great fortune was the aim and purpose of Astor's life, and he accomplished it by dominating the American fur trade and investing his profits in the real estate of burgeoning New York City. Shortly before his death, Astor was asked if he would have done anything differently with his life. He is supposed to have replied that his only regret was not having bought all of Manhattan. Astor was born in the small town of Waldorf, near Heidelberg, Germany. At twenty he followed his ...
    Related: jacob, real estate, louisiana purchase, york public library, operating
  • Reconstruction - 2,247 words
    ... on Washington in 1964 the goals had changed to guaranteeing all Americans equality of opportunity, integration both social and political, and the more amorphous goal of a biracial democracy.32 But the goals did not include the need to transform the economic condition of Blacks. Instead they emphasized the need to transform the political At the beginning, the Civil Rights Movement sought solutions to racial injustice through laws and used the Federal courtsto secure them. The Supreme Court set the stage in 1954 with Brown vs. The Board of Education of Topeka Kansas: the Brown decision focused the attention of dominant Black institutions such as CORE (Congress On Racial Equality) and the N ...
    Related: reconstruction, black consciousness, black community, economic justice, carpenter
  • Great Depression - 1,665 words
    The Great Depression was the worst economic slump ever in U.S. history, and one which touched virtually all of the industrialized world. The Depression began in late 1929 and lasted for nearly a decade. Many factors played a role in bringing about the Depression; however, the main cause for the Great Depression was the combination of the greatly unequal distribution of wealth throughout the 1920's, and the extensive stock market speculation that took place during the latter part that same decade. The mal-distribution of wealth in the 1920's existed on many levels. Money was distributed disparately between the rich and the middle-class, between industry and agriculture within the United State ...
    Related: great depression, credit sales, united states, middle class, maintenance
  • Reconstruction - 1,156 words
    After the Civil War ended, President Lincoln was faced with the task of rejoining a Union which was thriving less than fifty years earlier. In 1863 to achieve this goal, Lincoln introduced his restoration plan to the country. During this time of Reconstruction many compromises were made in order to bring the south into American society once more, while incorporating the needs of the newly emancipated slaves. Although Lincoln was very helpful in trying to join the north and south, he was assassinated before and his successor, Andrew Johnson disliked by the majority of the nation, could not follow through with its ideals. During this time, ex-slaves were trying to integrate into the new Americ ...
    Related: reconstruction, president andrew johnson, fourteenth amendment, radical republicans, theater
  • Rooselvelt - 5,160 words
    ... refully prepared plans were ready to be implemented almost at once. Huge public buildings, great dams, and irrigation and flood-control projects are part of PWAs legacy. The most spectacular agency designed to promote general economic improvement was the National Recovery Administration (NRA), an organization set up (along with the PWA) by the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA), which was passed by Congress in June 1933. The NRA was designed to help business help itself. Unfair competition was supposed to be eliminated through the establishment of codes of fair competition; in effect, laws against combinations of large businesses were to be suspended in exchange for guarantees to wo ...
    Related: buenos aires, national organization, american federation, negotiate, partly
  • Ben Franklin Biographycritique - 1,621 words
    In his many careers as a printer, moralist, essayist, civic leader, scientist, inventor, statesman, diplomat, and philosopher, for later generations of Americans he became both a spokesman and a model for the national character. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts on Jan. 17, 1706, into a religious Puritan household. His father, Josiah, was a candlemaker and a skillful mechanic. His mother, Abiah Bens parents raised thirteen children--the survivors of Josiahs seventeen children by two wives (#1). Franklin left school at ten years old when he was pressed into his father's trade. At twelve Ben was apprenticed to his half brother James, a printer of The New England Courant. He generally absorb ...
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  • Native American Abuse - 993 words
    Imagine your country had been invaded by a very powerful group of people. Before anything drastic could be done these people had invaded your shores and had creeping inward upon your land. At first they acted with scorn and called us names and disrespect. After several groups of our people revolted against these invaders they decided to negotiate certain terms with us. Then after thinking all was well many of these agreements were broken and they started to ship us like freight to areas where they could hold a lot of our kind while they abuse and take over our country/land. We tried to fight back but it was useless, we were at their strong armys demise. It is sad that such atrocities were do ...
    Related: american, native american, native american tribes, native americans, united states federal
  • Lassezfaire Government - 389 words
    Laissez-faire policy has always been a fundamental principle of the federal government. Between the years of 1860 and 1900, the governments role seems to be very small. New government policies are almost nonexistent and the few policies they enforced were standard government administrations. However, toward the end of the century, economic growth in the US can be linked to direct government intervention. From the mid 1970s to the early 1890s, the federal followed standard government procedure and maintained the national military, conducted foreign policy and collected tariffs and taxes. The national government had little diversions to result in additional responsibilities. The lone exception ...
    Related: federal government, government intervention, national government, american industry, laissez faire
  • Characterization Of Democratic Republicans - 733 words
    The Democratic Republicans were almost always characterized as believing in following the strict construction of the constitution. They were opposed to the loose interpretation the Federalists used. The presidencies of Jefferson and Madison proved this characterization to be somewhat accurate. It is true that both Jefferson and Madison supported the ideas of the Democratic Rebublicans but, they also did many things that contradicted them. In Thomas Jefferson's letter to Gideon Granger, Jefferson shows his ideas on how the Constitution should be interpreted and how they oppose that of the Federalists. Jefferson tells Granger that he believes they will be able to obtain a legislature which wil ...
    Related: characterization, democratic, states rights, economic depression, republicanism
  • A Modernday Revolution American Turmoil In The 1960s - 1,547 words
    Hubert Humphrey once stated, When we say, One nation under God, with liberty and justice for all, we are talking about all people. We either ought to believe it or quit saying it (Hakim 111). During the 1960s, a great number of people did, in fact, begin to believe it. These years were a time of great change for America. The country was literally redefined as people from all walks of life fought to uphold their standards on what they believed a true democracy is made of; equal rights for all races, freedom of speech, and the right to stay out of wars in which they felt they didnt belong. The music of the era did a lot of defining and upholding as well; in fact, it was a driving force, or at ...
    Related: american, american youth, revolution, turmoil, sunday school
  • American Immigration - 613 words
    In the decades following the Civil War, the United States emerged as an industrial giant. Old industries expanded and many new ones, including petroleum refining, steel manufacturing, and electrical power, emerged. Railroads expanded significantly, bringing even remote parts of the country into a national market economy. America was the ideal place. In the late 1800s, people in many parts of the world decided to leave their homes and immigrate to the United States. Fleeing crop failure, a shortage in land, and employment, rising taxes, and famine, many came to the U. S. because it was perceived as the land of economic opportunity. Others came seeking personal freedom or relief from political ...
    Related: american, american immigration, american society, immigration, physical abuse
  • Dbq Federalist Vs Antifederalist - 1,002 words
    It can be argued that the Federalists were the first political party in the United States. Their goal was simple; to unite the states and form a strong central government. There were various attempts at uniting the states, the first of which was the Articles of Confederation. These articles were not effective due to the fact that they did not have the power to tax the States or the power to enforce a uniform commercial policy. This caused the government to basically go bankrupt, and when this occurred, it was evident that the Federalists had failed in their plan of union. Their next attempt, the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, was successful in uniting the States, but still lacked ...
    Related: federalist, major problem, constitutional convention, native americans, rebellion
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