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Free research essays on topics related to: india

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  • The Conflict Of Women In 20th Century India - 1,709 words
    The Conflict of Women in 20th Century India Throughout recorded history, women all over the world have been held to a different standard than men. They have consistently been oppressed in nearly all aspects of life, from political to personal. In the 20th century though, great strides have been taken to end this oppression and level the playing field. However, in India, a number of deeply rooted traditions have made this effort all the more difficult, and as a result, women's triumphs over oppression in India are all the more intriguing. To understand the position Women found themselves in at the dawn of the 20th century, one must have a general understanding of their numerous historical con ...
    Related: century women, history women, india, women in india, young women
  • British East India Company - 655 words
    The British East India Company was the main source of trade between the east and Britain for more that 200 years. I chose to do my research paper on the British east India Company. The British east India Company was the most important of the various East India companies; this company was a major force in the history of India for more than 200 years. Queen Elizabeth I granted the original charter on December 31, 1600, under the title of "The Governor and Company of Merchants of London Trading into the East Indies." The company was granted a monopoly of trade in the East Indies, with the formal restriction that it might not contest the prior trading rights of "any Christian prince." A governor ...
    Related: british army, british east, british government, east india, east indies, india, india company
  • Two Periods Of Buddhist Art In India - 1,433 words
    Two Periods of Buddhist Art in India Less than 1% of the population of modern India is Buddhist. Therefore, it is reasonable to say that Indias importance for Buddhism and its art is mainly its historical influence. Not only is India the country where the historical Buddha, Shakyamuni, lived and taught, but it is the land where the first images of the Buddha were produced and where Buddhist iconography and symbolism evolved. Being a student whose family originates in India, I am interested in some of the historical aspects and influences of Buddhist Art in India. Therefore, my study of this topic extends to two of the most important periods of Buddhist art in India, the Kushan and the Gupta ...
    Related: ancient india, buddhism in india, buddhist, india, modern india, northern india
  • Two Periods Of Buddhist Art In India - 1,481 words
    ... 40) has earned the title of the golden age of India as it was a period of great military strength, wealth and prosperity, and a period where the arts and sciences flourished. Historical background of a dynasty is always important in discussing art, however the historical background of the Gupta period will not be discussed in detail because it is not directly related to the thesis. My discussion of Gupta art deals mainly with the latter developments of the 5th and 6th centuries. However, it is important to note that the sculptural style of the Gupta period is not an isolated development, and was indeed influenced by the prior sculpture schools of Mathura and Gandhara. Nevertheless, the B ...
    Related: ancient india, buddhism in india, buddhist, buddhist teachings, india
  • India - 1,088 words
    Indias long struggle for independence started in 1857 with East India Company. British originally came to do business in India but later on took over India. There was a great battle fought in India in 1857. The kingdoms fought east India Company troops with weapons and many lives were lost. However, shortly after that in 1858, British rule was introduced. A British Governor was sent to India and India was made part of British Empire. India felt they needed democracy. They wanted to stop exploitation of Indian people by Britain. This battle was fought to get self-rule and freedom from Britain. In 1869, a great person was born, who spent all his life fighting injustice. His name was Mohandas K ...
    Related: east india, india, india and pakistan, india company, new york
  • My Vision Of 21 Century India - 1,913 words
    MY VISION OF INDIA IN THE 21ST CENTURY. In a bid to provide my vision for and of India in the 21st century, I put forward my perception, views and opinions under different topics and also issues and roles of different institutions and individuals. I propose to provide an ideal situation for our country in the 21st century by following a concept called Applied Politics. I feel it as appropriate in the sense that my concept of politics is to solve the problems of the day through intelligent governing. Politics is a tool to perform and to show results and hence the term Applied Politics. The Applied Politics is based on the following aspects of the lives of human beings : Every individual will ...
    Related: india, public places, cultural history, income tax, amendment
  • Biast Against Female Infanicide In India - 431 words
    The bias against females in India is related to the fact that "Sons are called upon to provide the income; they are the ones who do most of the work in the fields. In this way sons are looked to as a type of insurance. With this perspective, it becomes clearer that the high value given to males decreases the value given to females." (Marina Porras, "Female Infanticide and Foeticide".) The problem is also intimately tied to the institution of dowry, in which the family of a prospective bride must pay enormous sums of money to the family in which the woman will live after marriage. Though formally outlawed, the institution is still pervasive. "The combination of dowry and wedding expenses usua ...
    Related: india, higher education, indian state, the girl, infant
  • A Passage To India - 668 words
    The first chapter of A Passage to India describes the setting of the novel. Forster establishes Chandrapore as a prototypical Indian town, neither distinguished nor exceptionally troubled. This town can therefore be taken to be symbolic of the rest of India rather than an exceptional case. This allows the actions that occur in the following chapters to be representative of the Anglo-Indian colonial relations that will dominate the events of the novel. By beginning the novel with a mention of the Marabar Caves, Forster foreshadows later events that will occur concerning the Marabar Caves and that will provide the narrative turning point of A Passage to India. It is significant that Forster do ...
    Related: british india, india, passage to india, major themes, important role
  • India - 787 words
    Hindu life styles and beliefs are focused mainly on one single worldview that everyone accepts and worships. Samsara is a continued cycle of ongoing rebirths, ones ultimate goal throughout each life is to attain the state of Moksha. Moksha is achieved when one realizes the true nature of surrounding life. Once Moksha is attained the endless cycles of karmic trajectories are finally released along with the eternal cycles of recurring rebirths. The Maya is described as a covering of ones true Moksha, an ignorance or false views of ones true nature. Without the attainment of knowledge or realization of true nature, than Moksha will never be fulfilled, consequently the infinite cycle of rebirths ...
    Related: india, religion and culture, ultimate goal, social structure, ideology
  • India's Nuclear Weapons - 347 words
    This event is in the news because a country violated a law that the entire world agreed on not doing anymore. India have always wanted to become nuclear, and their wish came true. They accepted their consequences of being nuclear, but they are happy. It's neighboring country Pakistan and India have had two wars, and always competed to be the best, and so far India is winning, because India have about 65 warheads and Pakistan have about 25 warheads. India have also declared they have nuclear capability were as Pakistan have not. India is exceptionally proud of having nuclear power, after conducting their first test in 1976, and then five in the year 1998. India have always wanted to be known ...
    Related: nuclear, nuclear power, nuclear weapons, united states, united kingdom
  • Culture Of India - 1,780 words
    ... tron-client alliances among various castes remain a common feature of village life. Most villages have at least a primary school offering up to six years of instruction. Some also offer adult education classes in the evening. While few villages can support a well-trained doctor, many have practitioners of traditional medicine. Government-aided dispensaries are increasingly common. For entertainment men join their fellow caste members or those from castes at levels close to their own to pass the evening hours smoking and chatting. Women and girls talk at the village well and may join groups to sing religious songs. Male youths sometimes form sports clubs or drama groups. Village-owned rad ...
    Related: ancient india, india, south india, prime minister, united kingdom
  • History Of Punjab: State Of Sikh Religion (situated In North Of India And East Of Pakistan) - 701 words
    Punjab, state in northwestern India,bordered on the north by Jammu and Kashmir state and Himachal Pradesh state, on the east and south by Haryana state, on the south and southwest by Rajasthan state, and on the west by Pakistan. Punjab state lies between the great systems of the Indus and Ganges river. Punjab had a population of 20,281,969. Chandgarh is the state capital. The population of Punjab consists mainly of Punjabis, Jats, and Rajputs. The official language is Punjabi. The majority of the population is Sikh, the largest minority is Hindu, and a very small percentage is Muslim, Buddhist, Christian, or Jain. 59% of Punjab population is literate. Universities located in the state includ ...
    Related: hindu religion, human history, india, north india, north west, sikh, world history
  • British Imperialism In India - 1,652 words
    All the leadership had spent their early years in England. They were influenced by British thought, British ideas, that is why our leaders were always telling the British "How can you do these things? Theyre against your own basic values.". We had no hatred, in fact it was the other way round - it was their values that made us revolt." -Aruna Asaf Ali, a leader of the Indian National Congress. (Masani, quoted in Wood, 32, 1989) There is no doubt that British imperialism had a large impact on India. India, having previously been an group of independent and semi-independent princedoms and territories, underwent great change under British administration. Originally intended to consolidate their ...
    Related: british colonial, british forces, british imperialism, british rule, imperialism, india
  • Caste System In India - 531 words
    The caste system, or Varna, of India, came about when the Aryan speaking Nomadic groups came to India about 1500B.C.. The Aryan priests divided society into a caste system with four parts. This system determined Indian occupations. The priests and teachers were the highest caste. The second in rank were rulers and warriors, with merchants and traders third in rank. Last were the workers and peasants who were born to be servants to the other three castes. People could not change their caste. They had to marry and socialize with people from their own caste. This is very different from the class system of America. In the United States class is determined by how much wealth you have, not usually ...
    Related: caste, caste system, india, middle class, upper class
  • Hindu-muslim Relations In India - 755 words
    The strife between Hindus and Muslims date back to the 16th century. After the Mughals took over India, there was relative peace for some time between the Hindus and Muslims. This harmony between these two groups broke down, with the harsh Muslim rule at the end of the 17th century. Under the strict Mughal leader Aurangzeb, Taxes were imposed on all Hindus, after they had previously been abolished, Hindu temples were destroyed, and Hindus were forced to convert to Islam. By the 18th century the Mughal Dynasty had fallen apart, leaving the Indian subcontinent open and defenseless. Consequently the British moved in, yet as the British were gaining control, both Hindus and Muslims came together ...
    Related: india, national congress, decision making, indian government, gandhi
  • Imperialism In India - 704 words
    British imperialism on India had many positive and negative affects on both the mother country, Britain and the colony, India. Many people would argue which effects were more prominent in these countries and some would agree that they were equal. But in both cases there were actually both. In India the British colonization had more positive affects than negative. For Instance, When the British colonized India they built 40,000 miles of railroad and 70,000 miles of paved roadway. As a result the British made it much easier to travel across India. Another good affect that the British had on India was the jump in agriculture, through large scale irrigation works. About 30 million acres were put ...
    Related: british imperialism, imperialism, india, negative effect, great britain
  • India And Mesopotamia - 521 words
    There were many differences between these two countries (India and Mesopotamia). They had very little amount of similarities but they had a very strong equal amount of life format. Mesopotamia believed that there was no afterlife and that it was called the place of no return. They were polytheistic and that meant that they had an intense belief that nature gods are responsible for life. They also had a very different social class order, which was in: Rulers or lord/Priests Free commoners: like craftsmen Dependent clients: no property, taxes, which was food Slaves: also called POW, criminals, people who owed money that could even buy their freedom back This place also had a strong male societ ...
    Related: india, mesopotamia, tigris river, lower class, bengal
  • President Bush And Relations With India - 380 words
    Bush also spoke with Vajpayee and said the United States is ``determined to cooperate with India in the fight against terrorism,'' McClellan said. Bush urged both leaders to work to reduce tensions. Pakistani police say they have arrested at least 30 militants since the Dec. 13 attack by gunmen on India's Parliament that sparked the current crisis between the South Asian rivals. On Friday, Bush had praised Musharraf for the arrests and said India should ``take note'' of the crackdown. India has dismissed Pakistan's steps as cosmetic and on Saturday demanded tougher action. Pakistan has said it needs proof for India's claims that two Islamic militant groups based on its soil conducted the Par ...
    Related: bush, india, president bush, national security, south asian
  • Two Wheeler Market In India - 1,358 words
    INTRODUCTION: The Indian two wheeler market has a size of over Rs 100,000 million. The Indian two wheeler segment contributes the largest volumes amongst all the segments in automobile industry. Though the segment can be broadly categorized into 3 sub-segments viz; scooters, motorcycles and mopeds; some categories introduced in the market are a combination of two or more segments e.g. scooterettes and step thrus. The market primarily comprises five players in the two wheeler segment with most of the companies having foreign collaborations with well-known Japanese firms earlier. But most of the companies are now planning 100% subsidiaries in India. In the last four to five years, the two-whee ...
    Related: current market, india, market share, wheeler, automobile industry
  • Moguls In India - 523 words
    Moguls were a Muslim dynasty in India from fifteen twenty-six to about eighteen fifty-seven. Lets first define the word Mogul. The word Mogul means an Indian Muslim of or descended from one of several conquering groups of Mongol, Turkish, and Persian origin. The word Mogul is the Arabic and Persian version of Mongol. The Moguls were a Muslim dynasty founded in fifteen twenty-six by a man named Babur. Babur was a descendent of both Genghis Kahn and Timur. The dynasty ruled much of the Indian subcontinent until the mid eighteenth century. Babur claimed the subcontinent as his right of inheritance because of the conquest of Delhi by his ancestor Timur. Babur was a highly cultured man from Persi ...
    Related: india, north india, eighteenth century, indian subcontinent, machinery
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