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Free research essays on topics related to: american novel

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  • Historical Intro Of The Challenge To Social Classes - 1,378 words
    The historical introduction of the Challenge to Social Classes A journey through the twentieth century in America via the trials and tribulations as offered by American novelists depicts a common social evolution. Struggle, discontent, and the inherent obstacles in life are not particularly unique to the characters of the American novelist, however the experiences and the perseverance of each have defined our country and our society in similar ways. Many novels of this period depict the hardships endured by immigrants to this country as well as those who may revert to an immigrant class at some point in life. Historically, social class was a birthright (or wrong). The content and discontent ...
    Related: intro, social change, social class, social classes, social evolution, social structure
  • The Jungle - 1,045 words
    ... ch men labored on slippery floors processing the meat. Open vats laid upon the level of the floor, the peculiar trouble of these workers was they fell into the vats; and when they were fished out, there was never enough of them left to be worth exhibiting. Sometimes they would be overlooked for days, till all but the bones of them had gone out to the world as Andersons Pure Leaf Lard (Cook 112)! To insure that the meatpacking plants would stay open the owners would do just about anything. Any inspector who tried to interfere with the system did not last long. Government inspectors were afraid for their life, so they would lie and pass the meat off as okay for public consumption. Owners p ...
    Related: jungle, the jungle, american novel, president theodore roosevelt, congressmen
  • Hemingways Writing Style - 1,637 words
    Hemingway's style left a deep imprint on the landscape of prose In the years after the First World War, the Young Man Who Lived and Loved Hard and Wrote Well revolutionized American literature. His prose was a symphony of short, strong, sonorous sentences. His heroes were men broken by the world but left "strong at the broken places." His women were both strong and weak, and they were always very beautiful in their summer dresses. The Young Man Who Lived and Loved Hard and Wrote Well lied out of his mouth and told the truth out of his typewriter. He defined courage better than any writer ever had before. But he died a coward's death by his own hand, his brains and blood staining the foyer of ...
    Related: art of writing, ernest hemingway, literary style, writing skills, writing style
  • Eudora Welty And Jack London - 1,695 words
    ... es a game to see who can kill first. It is inevitable that someone must die in order to ratify his own life. London emphasizes the theme of honor in death. The only honorable thing to do was to kill and be killed in The Death of a Legion. Had the blood bath not ended with Legion being dead, then he would have been a disgrace to his tribe. In Clytie, Welty depicts the mentally disturbed womens death as an ultimatum to the horrible life she was forced to partake of. There was no honor in her death. However there was no honor in her life either. Jack London and Eudora Welty have written these brilliant works to motivate some emotion within their readers. Welty characteristically tries to in ...
    Related: eudora, eudora welty, jack, jack london, london, welty
  • Writings Of F Scott Fitzgerald - 1,719 words
    ... picture in his mind to mundane reality. The Great Gatsby abounds in touches like these. The Great Gatsby has inspired probably as much critical commentary as any other twentieth-century American novel, but it is so intricately patterned and tightly knit, so beautifully integrated through a series of parallels, that it hardly seems possible that criticism will exhaust the novel. If This Side of Paradise resembles the Wellsian novel of saturation, where everything is included, The Great Gatsby epitomizes the Jamesian novel of selection, where every detail fits and nothing is superfluous. The reviews for The Great Gatsby were the most favorable so far. Fresh from The Great Gatsby, Fitzgera ...
    Related: f scott fitzgerald, f. scott fitzgerald, fitzgerald, scott, scott fitzgerald
  • Alice Walker - 833 words
    There are many different types of authors in the world of literature, authors of horror, romance, suspense, and the type that Alice Walker writes. Alice Walker writes through her feelings and the morals she has grown with, she writes about the black womans struggle for spiritual wholeness and sexual, political, and racial equality. Although most critics categorize her writings as feminist, Walker describes herself as a womanist, she defines this as a woman who loves other woman...Appreciates and prefers woman culture, womans emotional flexibility... and womans strength... Loves the spirit... Loves herself, Regardless. Walkers thoughts and feelings show through in her writing of poetry and no ...
    Related: alice, alice walker, walker, lost sister, civil rights movement
  • Williams William Carlos - 988 words
    Williams, William Carlos (1883-1963), American writer, whose use of simple, direct language marked a new course in 20th-century poetry. Unlike some other writers of his time, such as T. S. Eliot, Williams avoided complexity and obscure symbolism. Instead, he produced lyrics, such as this one from "January Morning" (1938), that contain few difficult references: "All this-/ was for you, old woman./ I wanted to write a poem/ that you would understand." Williams's greatest achievement as a writer was the epic Paterson (5 volumes, 1946-1958), which is a landmark of 20th-century poetry. Williams was born in Rutherford, New Jersey. His father, William George Williams, was from Britain, and his moth ...
    Related: carlos, william carlos, william carlos williams, american history, allen ginsberg
  • Greed - 605 words
    The Obsession with Money and Greed in American Society Since the Industrial Revolution in the United States, The American people have been obsessed with the dollar. Americans try to imitate the wealthy to hopefully make money. The money that we do make is immediately spent. Therefore, there is a rise in consumerism and materialism. Also, good qualities that people usually associate with everyday ways of life have been concentrated an fattening peoples pocketbooks. According to the classic American novel The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, this country has become a valley of ashes-a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat. This leads to the conclusion that the American Dream has disso ...
    Related: greed, cost of living, united states, american society, fill
  • Changes Of A Scarlet Letter - 341 words
    In the first true American novel, The Scarlet Letter, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne, there is an inspiring young women named Hester Prynne. This character changes from the beginning of the novel to chapter thirteen. At the outset of this book Hester is a very beautiful and strong women. When she walks out of the prison she is very beautiful. The young woman was tall, with a figure of perfect elegance . . . she had dark and abundant hair, so glossy that it threw off the sun with a gleam, and a face which, besides being beautiful from regularity of feature . . . the impressive belonging to a marked brow and deep black eyes(51). The author show Hesters beauty threw phsyical appearance. She is ...
    Related: scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter, young woman, young women
  • The Great Gatsby - Jay Gatsby's Greatness - 1,409 words
    The greatness of an individual can be defined in terms far beyond tangible accomplishments. In F. Scott Fitzgeralds classic American novel, The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsbys greatness comes from his need to experience success and his will to achieve his dreams. Nick Carraway narrates the story, and his cousin, Daisy Buchanan, is Gatsbys love. Daisy, however, is married to Tom Buchanan, a wealthy, arrogant womanizer who despises Gatsby. Gatsby feels the need to be successful and wealthy, and his participation in a bootlegging operation allows him to acquire the wealth and social status needed to attract Daisy. In his narration, Nick focuses on Gatsbys fixation of Daisy and how he longs for her pr ...
    Related: gatsby, great gatsby, greatness, jay gatsby, the great gatsby
  • Masculinity In Hemingway - 1,180 words
    Brandon Huiner Professor F. Luciani Masters of the Short Story 7 November 2002 Hemingways Portrayal of Masculinity When thinking of masculinity in literature, one author has who has become synonymous with manliness comes to mind, Ernest Hemingway. Critics have spent countless hours studying his writing in order to gain insight into his world of manly delights, including his views on sex, war, and sport. His views can be seen through his characters, his themes and even his style of writing. The characters in Hemingways stories reveal much about how he feels about men and the role they should play in society. Most of Hemingways male characters can be split into one of two groups. The first of ...
    Related: ernest hemingway, hemingway, masculinity, rises hemingway, american novel
  • The Great Gatsby - 1,391 words
    Amidst the exceedingly prosperous decade of the 1920s, traditional American lifestyles and principles were interjected by the new superficial and materialistic beliefs closely associated with The Roaring Twenties. Undoubtedly, the 1920s were a decade of change. Deteriorating moralities and optimistic beliefs of overnight wealth replaced strict traditional views on religion, family structure, and work ethics. In an era of such high optimism, the pioneering spirit of the American Dream was revitalized. The nouveaux riches often clashed with the established wealth, as evident throughout F. Scott Fitzgeralds The Great Gatsby. Fitzgeralds narrator, Nick Carraway, suddenly finds himself submerged ...
    Related: gatsby, great american, great gatsby, the great gatsby, roaring twenties
  • Puritianism And Literary Techniques In "the Scarlet Letter" - 2,034 words
    ... s and timidity. He aggravates his sin of adultery by his prolonged concealment of it and he further aggravates it by trying to keep up an appearance of piety. As the novel is primarily a story of fall of a great priest, we can easily defy Dimmesdale as the tragic hero. His life is also one long misery. He succumbs to temptation once again when in the course of his forest interview with Hester; he agrees to flee from Boston with her, though he could not stick to it. This action also leads him to collapse and makes him a tragic hero. His weakness magnifies rather than lessens the power of story. His fight is internal. His confession to the public is in of the noblest climaxes in stories to ...
    Related: literary techniques, scarlet, scarlet letter, the scarlet letter, american novel
  • Going After Cacciato - 925 words
    It is generally recognized that Tim OBriens Going After Cacciato (1978) is most likely the best novel of the Vietnam war, albeit an unusual one in that it innovatively combines the experiential realism of war with surrealism, primarily through the overactive imagination of the protagonist, Spec Four Paul Berlin. The first chapter of this novel is of more than usual importance. Designed to be a self-sufficient story (McCaffery 137) and often anthologized as one, this chapter is crucial to the novel in that it not only introduces us to the characters and the situation but also sets the tenor of the novel and reveals its authors view of this war in relation to which all else in the novel must b ...
    Related: american novel, vietnam war, modern fiction, dope, durham
  • View On Slavery In Mark Twains Writing - 1,378 words
    ... istrations (Sloane 118). Twain realized the harsh treatments towards blacks. He also noticed that whites most likely did not realize the great deal of suffering that the average black person received. He felt that writers could address this issue during this time; however, many people did not choose to discuss this in their novel. Twain attempted to teach the American public on the issue of slavery and the attempt to close the gap between whites and blacks (Sloane 119). Twain wrote another book called Puddnhead Wilson. The novel was published in 1894. Again this book begins in a small town near the Mississippi River called Dawsons Landing. Puddnhead Wilson is an anti-slavery novel that r ...
    Related: mark twain, the prince, everyday life, civil war, twins
  • Historic Analysis Of Twain's "huckleberry Finn" - 600 words
    The movie that the class watched dealt with the classic novel Huckleberry Finn written by Mark Twain. Huckleberry Finn was written in the late 19th century, but it takes place during slavery in the southern United States. The book revolves around the adventures of a white farm boy from Mississippi, Huckleberry, and a run away slave Jim, as they try to reach the North and freedom. Written in the narrated view of the main character Huckleberry Finn, the grammar and language of the day is incorporated into the book, including the word nigger. Nigger is used in the book around 200 times and it is for this reason that some school boards have banned it and furious debates about allowing literature ...
    Related: historic, united states, north america, best friend, dealt
  • Legal Themes In To Kill A Mocking Bird - 1,888 words
    This is an essay about To Kill A Mocking Bird. Throughout the course of history there have always been men and women who have preyed on the innocent. They do this not because it is easy, nor because it is hard, but rather because they can. They are the aftermath of poverty and poor upbringings. These universal troublemakers are present in every form of society. They believe that the ends always justify the means as long as the fate of their mischief is bestowed upon someone else. At times like this, those who fall victim to their folly are the innocent. This is the reoccurring theme in the classic American novel written by Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird, published in 1960. In the world th ...
    Related: bird, mocking, to kill a mockingbird, american novel, ice cream
  • Examples Of Canadian Thinking In "the Whirlpool" - 1,386 words
    To many people pride in ones country is an important thing. The characters in the novel The Whirlpool show their pride in and love for Canada in different ways, many of the characters have their own way of seeing Canada. In an article on The Whirlpool and Canada, Dr. Kelly Hewson discusses the ways in which the characters see Canada and each other. The characters in The Whirlpool have different views and ideas about Canada and what it means to be and think Canadian. In order to be a member of a group one must think like the group. Canadians have their own ideas and ways of thinking Canadian. Canadians feel that they have to keep Canada safe; they feel the need to claim ownership and to prote ...
    Related: canadian, canadian history, different views, over time, flower
  • Analysis Of Hersey And Hiroshima - 611 words
    Hiroshima traces the experiences of six residents who survived the atomic blast of August 6, 1945 at 8:15 am. The six people vary in age, education, financial status and employment. Miss Toshiko Sasaki, a personnel clerk; Dr. Masakazu Fuji, a physician; Mrs. Hatsuyo Nakamura, a tailor's widow with three small children; Father Wilhelm Kleinsorge, a German missionary priest; Dr. Terufumi Sasaki, and the Reverend Kiyoshi Tanimoto are the six Hersey chose from dozens of people he interviewed. The book opens with what each person was doing moments before the blast and follows their next few hours, continuing through the next several days and then ending with their situation a year later. In the o ...
    Related: hersey, hiroshima, individual level, pulitzer prize, widow
  • Synopsis And Summary Of The Scarlet Letter - 1,564 words
    The Scarlet Letter, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne in the mid 19th century is considered the first great American novel and Hawthornes best work(Thompson 312) The setting of the novel was in Boston in the 17th century, when Puritanism was in full effect. The author of the novel, Nathaniel Hawthorne, changed his name from Hathorne to Hawthorne because he was ashamed that he was in direct line of decent of Judge Hathorne who had been one of the persecutors in the Salem witch trials. It was said by Keith Nelson, a writing critic, that Hawthornes style of writing is contemporary, yet still old fashioned. It is contemporary because Hawthorne was fascinated by the truth, but the truth was not alwa ...
    Related: scarlet, scarlet letter, summary, synopsis, the scarlet letter
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